Research

An efficient system to identify virulence patterns in stripe rust in Canadian

  • Term: 3 years, beginning in 2018
  • Funding Amount: $ 67,650
  • Lead Researcher(s): Reem Aboukhaddour (Agriculture and Agri Food Canada)
  • Funding Partners: Alberta Wheat Commission (AWC)

Project Description:

This research aims at facilitating the deployment of stripe rust resistance in Canadian wheat and to ease breeding efforts in finding unidentified resistance sources existing in our own Canadian adopted genotypes and cultivars.

Stripe (yellow) rust disease is a serious threat to wheat production in Canada. Breeding efforts to develop resistant varieties are based on integrating effective resistance genes (Yr genes) that have not been defeated yet by the pathogen. This requires constant screening of rust isolates on a number of wheat differential lines that each carries a single Yr gene. The current differentials are inefficient in distinguishing virulence patterns (races) that matter to Canadian producers and several genes in the differential lines are defeated for long time or not necessarily reflective on the resistance sources in the Canadian wheat germplasm used by breeders. The differential lines are also missing important newly identified resistance sources. Evaluating resistance is done mainly at adult plant stage under the field conditions, using a mix of natural occurring isolates without precise knowledge on the most prevalent rust races (virulence patterns), frequency and regional differences. Yet, successful management for stripe rust necessitates an understanding of these factors.

The virulence of rust changes in over a short period of time, persistent looking for non-defeated resistance sources is critical. This is done by screening isolates on wheat genotypes, that each carries unique resistance gene, under controlled conditions. This project aims at doing so and also expanding these genotypes with regional lines that can translate to the benefit of Canadian producers.

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